New research shows that children’s brains can “re-map” following surgery

8th January 2020

Groundbreaking research has found that the brains of children with severe epilepsy can remap themselves to regain functionality following surgery. This has been seen in a number of cases where the brain has changed to compensate for missing regions that have been surgically removed, particularly in the visual cortex.  A joint study between York University…

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Category: News

Myoclonic astatic epilepsy

4th January 2020

Myoclonic astatic epilepsy is an extremely uncommon epilepsy syndrome that affects only 2 out of every 100 children with epilepsy. It more commonly affects males and symptoms can become clear between the ages of 18 months and 5 years. This syndrome has no known cause, but is widely believed to be as a result of…

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Category: Syndromes

Festive drinking advice for people with epilepsy

13th December 2019

With the festive season upon us, we thought now would be a good time to touch on the effects of alcohol with people who have epilepsy. Of course, at this time of year it is much more tempting to enjoy a drink with more social events and many people having time off work with friends…

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Category: Leisure

Epilepsy surgery

19th November 2019

Epilepsy surgery is a blanket term for several different types of procedures, each of which can be vastly different and used for different types of epilepsy.  Surgery is usually one of the last options that will be suggested and is most common in people with epilepsy whose seizures cannot be controlled using anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs).…

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Category: Treatments

Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

13th November 2019

Lennox-Gastaut is a rare epilepsy syndrome that only affects between 1 to 5 children out of every 100 that have epilepsy. It’s also well known to be one of the most difficult childhood epilepsies to treat, also known as ‘intractable’. Lennox-Gastaut syndrome usually starts in children between the ages of 3 to 5, although it…

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Category: Syndromes

Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS)

4th November 2019

Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a type of epilepsy surgery that involves implanting an electrode into the brain and a neurostimulator into the chest, usually just below the left collarbone.  DBS is a type of ‘neuromodulation’, similar to vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). It has been used for both epilepsy and is also widely used for…

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Category: Treatments